Thursday, September 29, 2011

1921 New Congregational Church

First Congregational Church, Somers, Wisconsin
Photographer and Contributor: C.E. Dewey
Date:  June 18, 1939
The main part of the Congregational Church was a part of the Presbyterian Church built in 1839.  It was moved a number of  times.
(Source:  Photo Courtesy of Kenosha County Historical Society, Inc.)


Dedication of Church
"On Sunday, August 21, 1921, the new Congregational Church in the village was dedicated with most appropriate services.  The spacious auditorium was filled to over-flowing with people from the surrounding neighborhood.  Many former residents of Somers came from a distance to attend these impressive services.  The dedicatory services were in charge of the Rev. Harding Hogan, of the Plymouth Congregational Church of Racine.  He delivered a most excellent address.  The Rev. Hargett, pastor of the First Methodist Church of Racine gave a splendid sermon at the afternoon meeting and the Young People’s Union, also of Racine, closed the day of dedication with a sacred concert in the evening.  The music for the morning and afternoon services was given by local talent.  The Congregational Church of Somers is the union of the Presbyterian and Methodist Churches of the village and is built on the site of the former Presbyterian church.  This new organization is dedicated free of debt with a large membership and a splendid Sunday School enrollment.  The ladies of the society served luncheon at Woodmen Hall at noon. 
(Source: Racine Journal Times publication August 24, 1921)


"Work has begun on the remodeling of the church.  An addition is to be built on the east side of the building and considerable other improvements are to be made.  William Lauer and his force of men will do the work."
(Source:  Racine Journal Times publication February 24, 1921)

Formed in 1842 by a group of Bible students who were in the first caravan that settled Somers Township in Kenosha County, the Pike Grove American Bible Society will hold its 94th annual meeting in the Somers Congregational Church December 8 on the date of the commemoration of the 400th anniversary of the translation of the Bible into English. The organization is only a remnant of the original group.
(Source:  Racine Journal Times publication Dec. 3, 1935)


Wednesday, September 28, 2011

Wood Road School




Wood Road School, about 1910
Left to Right: Unknown Helding, Loretta Swartz, Unknown Helding, Ray Feest, Everett Learned, Walter Moran
Ms. Riley-Teacher, Roy Swartz, Oswald Feest, and Frank Birch
(Source:  Photo courtesy of Robert Swartz.  Copyright February 2012.  All Rights Reserved.)



Wood Road School, estimate date 1928
(Source:  Photo courtesy of Robert Swartz.  Copyright January 2012.  All Rights Reserved.)
Click on photo for larger view.


Wood Road School, Somers Township
(Source:  Photograph Courtesy of Jacqueline Klapproth Nelson and names courtesy of Jim and Sharon Bose Smith)

Teacher: Miss McCurly

Back Row: Jack Rider, George Godlewski, Norman Thompson, William Fenner, Gordon Peterson, Marion Jacobsen, Dorothy Gardinier, Florence Rider, Lorna Smith, Jean Thompson

2nd Row: Merlyn Smith, Frank Witscheber, Emory Scheckler, Bud Thomas, Delores Barrows, Anita Witscheber, Mary Jane Peterson, Hazel Scheckler, Julia Kremis

3rd Row: Charles Huck, Sam Jacobsen, Joe Kremis, Charles Thompson, Esther Scheckler, Violet Empke, Lucille Thompson, Anne Kastelic

4th Row: Harry Kastelic, Walter Keiffer, Clem Godlewski, Russell Mandernack, Kenneth Mandernack, Otto Keiffer, Minnie Birch, Mary Ellen Thompson, Sheila Ann Smith, Angeline Birch

School District No. 9 - Wood Road School
"The earliest record available in the history of School District No. 9 is that of July 1856, when The Town Superintendent of Schools in the Town of Somers having formed on the 12th day of July 1856 in said Town, called School District No.9.
October 17, 1856, legal notice having been given the inhabitants of School District No. 9, met at the house of Philander T. Briggs to elect School Officers for the ensuing year - John Gibson, Clerk;  William R. Stetson, Director;  Philander T. Briggs, Treasurer.
Voted to raise Two Hundred dollars ($200) in addition to be amount to be drawn from the Three Districts from which were set of for the purpose of building a school house and maintaining a school for the ensuing year.
December 1856, John Gibson removed and Wm. Swartz appointed Clerk in his place.
March 1857, contract to let Wm. Shott build school house by the Clerk and Director for Three Hundred Dollars.
June 14th, Board met and accepted schoolhouse.

September 28, 1857 School District No. 9 annual meeting called by Director.  The Treasurer made his report:
Moneys received during the year from Town Treasurer $200.00
Town Superintendent $69.76
Cash paid out on order to Wm. Shott $200.00
Chair $1.25
Pail, Broom and cup $0.75
Teacher wages 16 weeks $48.00
To my Suesefeer (?) $16.01
Cleaning lot $3.75
Balance $269.76

Officers elected for the ensuring year.  Wm. Swartz-Director, C.G. Stetson-Treasurer, Philander T. Briggs-Clerk.  Voted to get 6 cords of good oak wood, sawed, split, and piled up - - bid of Wm. Swartz at Three Dollars per cord.

Monday, September 27, 1858.  Cash paid out as follows:
To Wm. Slocum for Deed $1.50
To Bain and Brothers for stove and bell $16.06
To Wm. Swartz for wood $18.00
To Shott for balance on building schoolhouse $100.00
For Black Board $4.00
For Lumber and Glass, etc. $2.95
Charges on Dictionary $0.50
Miss F. Farnum for teaching $88.00
For Library Books $8.31
For 2 blank books and register $1.25
For moving desks $1.00
To Miss T.M. Briggs for teaching $52.00
For schoolhouse lot $20.00

District voted to appropriate $15.00 for back house, $5.00 for library.  To get 4 cords of dry oak wood, sawed, split and piled up for $3.00 per cord.

September 24, 1866.  Voted to raise $50 tax for school.  Voted to get 3 cords of wood.  Wm. Schwartz to furnish it at $7.00 a cord.  $10 tax for library.  Voted to have 4 months school.  May and June the first term - September and October, 2nd term.

The first building was sold in 1877 and a new buiding followed.  This was sold in 1927.  In 1926 a new red brick modern buiding was built on the first original site.

Among those early teachers were Julia Hawley, Bertie Fitch, Helena Ozanne, Carrie Burgess, Jessie Petrie, Delia Cutting, Ambrosia Cronk, Lottie Raymonds, Herbert Cooley, Jennie Hastings, Minnie Crow, Addie Strong, Charles Flett, who later studied medicine and located in South Dakota.

Board Members - William Stetson, who came from New York in 1835, served as school clerk for twenty-five consecutive years.  William and Jacob Swartz also served many years on the school board.

Among the early students were Lloyd Briggs, who for years was Professor at the Oaskosh State Normal; James Briggs, also a teacher and Supt. of Schools in Kenosha County."
(Source: My Memoirs, by Minnie A.G. Ozanne. Copyright 1948--Minnie A.G. Ozanne. All Rights Reserved.)


More About Wood Road School
The first Wood Road School building was sold in 1877 and is still being used on the Joseph Huck farm.  A second building constructed in that year was sold to George P. Thomas in 1927, after a new red brick building was contructed in 1926 on the site purchased for the original school building. 
(Source:  Kenosha News June 15, 1935 Centennial Edition) 



The First Wood Road School
(Source:  Original photo courtesy of Jim and Sharon Bose Smith.  Copyright 2012.  All Rights Reserved.)

Partial 1887 Map of Somers Township
See Section 12.  School District #9 was the Wood Road School
Located on the Peter Lichter parcel.

Wood Road School Reunion
Kenosha News article, date unknown
Photo taken of the Wood Road School reunion at the airplane hanger of Charles Thompson on Highway 50
(Source:  Photo Courtesy of Jacqueline Klapproth Nelson.  Copyright 2012.  All Rights Reserved.)

Front Row Kneeling Left to Right:  Vicki Kremis Klapproth, Man ?, Mary Ellen Thompson Werner, Harry Kastelic
Middle Left to Right:  Ann Kastelic, Lady?, Esther Scheckler, Charles Thompson, Joe Kremis, Sam Jacobsen, Charles Huck
Back Left to Right: Julie Kremis Covelli, Hazel Scheckler, Rita Neumiller, Lady?, Lady?, Marion Jacobsen, Lady?, Man?, Lady?, Man?

(If anyone can identify those people in question, please email Jackie at somershistory@wi.rr.com


Students and Teachers who attended the Wood Road reunion.
This was the sign-in registration list of the day.  The date was 1978.  It was found in the scrapbook of Vicki Kremis Klapproth.
(Source:  List courtesy of Jacqueline Klapproth Nelson)

Lulu Schmidter, Burlington, Wisconsin (teacher 1936-1937
Mabel McKee (teacher 1936-1937)
John and Jean Thomas Murphy, Kansasville, Wisconsin
Vicki Kremis Klapproth and Sherwood Klapproth, Somers Township
Charles Thompson
Lucile Thompson Conde, Cleveland Heights, Ohio
Top and Mamie Gardinier, Kenosha
Lucille Swartz, Kenosha
Susan Swartz Summers, Kenosha
Marge and Harry Kastelic, Kenosha
Lorna Miller, Kenosha
Ione Smith Kreamer and Ken Kreamer, Kenosha
Rich and Barb Free, Kenosha
Anne Kastelic, Kenosha
Caroline Bose King, Kenosha
Loretta Bose Ross, Chicago
Jack Rider, Racine
Mrs. Louise Rider, Racine
William and Lura Rider, Racine
Debres Barrows Safransky, Kenosha
Mary Ellen Thompson Werner, Kenosha
Ruth Thompson Smith and Paul Smith, Kenosha
Nancy Thompson, Bristol
Bob and Elaine Thomas, Kenosha
Vincent "Binnie" Thomas
Allie Smith, Kenosha
Ella and Wally Sadowski, Sturtevant
Mary Jane Acklam and George Petersen, Racine
John Conde, Cleveland Heights, Ohio
Mary Ann Verheyen - Mr. and Mrs. Jerry Baldwin, Racine
Harriet Thompson and Julius Camponeschi, Hammond, Indiana
Myrtle Emmertsen Jacobson, Kenosha, teacher 1946-1947
Leone Bose Aarts, Kenosha
Cyrstal and Henry Sablinsky, Yorkville
Martha Swartz, Kenosha
Jack Swartz, Kenosha
Mabel Thompson, McSkimming, Mrs. Thompsons' mother
Barry Mattausch, Bremerton, Washington
Julie and Bob Lewandowski Pringle, Kenosha, teacher 1951-1953
Don and Helen Upson, Janesville, Wisconsin, teacher 1934-1936
Ray and Helen Kremis Dorf, Racine
Julie Kremis Covelli, Racine
Gary Thompson
Joe and Sally Wise, Cleveland Heights, Ohio
Tom Conde
Paul and Mildred Swartz, Burlington
Dorothy Gardinier Hanks, Kenosha
Mary Godlewski Wojtak, Kenosha
Sam and Mary Jacobsen, Madison, Wisconsin
Marion Jacobsen Savich, Bonita, California
Gerty Kremis Hapanowicz and Richard, Kenosha
Marcia Thompson
Glenn Ours, Trevor
David Ours, Trevor
Hazel Scheckler Gitzlaff, Kenosha
Kathy Ours Bundever, Kenosha
Esther Scheckler Kaisir, Kenosha
Joe and Betty Lou Kremis, Sturtevant
LeRoy Leach, Kenosha
Don Scheckler, Racine
Kenny Holmes, Kenosha
Harry E. and Elsie Blinten, Sturtevant
Herb Gross, Kenosha
Alice Scheckler Meyer, Cudahy, Wisconsin
Dolores and Roy Safransky
Norman and Helen Thompson, Burchwood, Wisconsin
Gene Thompson and son, Ron, Burlington, Wisconsin
Klem Godlewski, Waukegan, Illinois
Tom Ricchio, Kenosha
Charles Huck, Somers Township
Frank and Anita Witscheber Storal, Kenosha
Kathy Larsen Roberts, Burlington, Wisconsin
Lois Meumiller, Kenosha
Albert and Violet Bose
Walter and Lil Andersen, Racine
Joe Weyres, Kenosha
Richard and Rosemary Thompson
Diane Thompson



Kenosha News article for Wood Road School reunion

(Source:  News clipping and names courtesy of Kim Heinen Bitto)

1877 Map and Minnie Ozanne Somers History

Partial Plat Map of 1887 Somers Township
The purpose of this blog page is to identify (1887 Map) some of the earliest settlement in Somers - along the Green Bay Trail.  The Green Bay Trail can be identified on the map above as the center north-south road in the middle of the map.  The intersection showing the "M.E. Church" is Highway E or Somers Road.
A few historical building photographs are shown below and are considered some of the oldest evidence of our historic settlement.   Although the landscape and structures have changed, you can take a ride and see for yourself where our history began.  I hope you enjoy finding the names on the map!
Click on this link to read Somers history written by Mrs. E.G. (Minnie) Ozanne, one our pioneers,  published in "Souvenir, Kenosha County Court House: and bits of yesterday, foundations of today" by Otis L. Trenary. 1925.

"Among the early settlers of Somers (1835) were Benjamin Felch, Hugh Longwell, Griffin and William Allen, Charles Leet, and William Smith.  Jacob Montgomery and his two sons built a log cabin near the present site of E.G. Ozanne's residence, the first in the town and in the county.  In the southeast part of the town Cephus Weed began his farming and on Pike River, Thomas Parsons built a sawmill (near Berryville).  This early immigration followed the Indian Trail which later became the Green Bay Road.  The plank road running from Racine and connecting with the plank road west out of Kenosha followed part of the old Green Bay Trail and ran near Petrifying Springs in Somers.  A toll gate was placed near the present home of George Leet.
In 1836 a weekly stage began to run from Chicago to Milwaukee over this Green Bay Trail, and the first Post Office was established at Willis's.  This tavern was located in the southwest corner of what is now the intersection of the Prairie Avenue Road with the Green Bay Road, Maxwell's Corners.  In this year, too, the first school taught by Miss Brizee was held in the Hugh Longwell house.  In the spring of 1837 the Kelloggs' - Chauncey, Seth H., and Thaddeus - with their families built their shanties and held their first religious meetings.  The result of the first Sunday School is shown when in 1860 a festival was held with an attendance of 300 children.
The Methodist Episcopal Church completed in 1840 was not only the first in the town of Somers, but we believe, the first in the state.
A Government observatory was built in 1860 on the William Robinson farm to a height of 72 feet.  This is on the present John Salentine farm on the hill about one mile south of the Somers Cemetery and Town Hall.  It is the highest point between Chicago and Milwaukee on the Green Bay Trial.  A pile of stones shows today where the tower stood.
The first frame barn built in the town was built for Rev. James Ozanne, and a part still stands.  By act of the state legislature, the town was named "Pike", April 15, 1843.  In 1851 "Pike was changed to "Somers".
On May 1, 1843, the first town meeting was held in the house of Charles Leet.  Joseph P. Hurlbut was chosen moderator of this meeting and Oscar Hurlbut, Clerk.  Tax raised in 1843 - $372.39; 1924, $96,594.  A farm of 88 acres in Somers in 1836 was valued at $1,040, the amount of taxes on this farm was $10.79."

Charles Leet Home
Contributor:  C.E. Dewey
This home was built in 1842 and it is believed that this picture shows the house in its original state.  It was remodeled in the 1860's at the close of the Civil War.  This property had been in the Leet family for one hundred years at the time this slide was produced. (1940).
(Source:  Photo Courtesy of Minnie Ozanne Family)

The Longwell House, residence of Hugh Longwell.
Southern Wisconsin's first public school building, erected in Somers Township in 1836, was held in the Longwell home with a Miss Brizee as the teacher.  In 1846 the Pike River school district was formed.  A new school building was constructed and opened in 1849.  Mr. Hugh Longwell, the first settler of Somers made a claim in March 1835 and settled where he resided with his family until his death.
Contributor:  University of Wisconsin
C.E.Dewey Collection
(Source:  Minnie Ozanne Family)


Hugh Longwell Biographical Sketch
Hugh Longwell was born in New York about 1798.  He married his wife Letta in New Jersey and the couple had six children.  Hugh Longwell's sister, Sarah Maria Longwell, was born in Somers Township in 1841 and married William Toase (a neighboring land owner in Section 2).  William's mother married a second time to George Haigh of Somers Township, a substantial farming family in Section 8.

Methodist Episcopal Church
Built by Austin Kellogg and his brothers around 1837 and was completed in 1840.  An addition was added at the front of the building some years later.  The church was torn down around 1910.  The timbers were hand-hewn out of solid oak.
(Source:  Photo Courtesy of Wisconsin Historical Society, Wisconsin Historical Images)





 

Berryville School History

 
 
The First Berryville School - 1855 
Berryville's first school, above, now is used for grain storage on the John Hansche farm in Berryville. The log structure was completed in 1855, and set amidst an area long known for the variety of berries growing around the farms. A second school was built in 1872 (see photo below) was later used for onion storage, and torn down about six years ago.
(Source: Photo Courtesy of Kenosha News November 8, 1955)
 
 
Berryville School - Class of 1877
 
(Source: Photo Courtesy of Kenosha News June 15, 1935 Centennial Edition)
 
 
Berryville Schoolhouse - Built 1872 
 
This is the second Berryville Schoolhouse, built in 1872.
33 students
"Dutch" Linstroth and his cousin "Dan" Klapproth (born 1894)
Click on photo for larger view.
(Original Photo Source:  Courtesy of Jacqueline Klapproth Nelson.  Copyright 2012.  All Rights Reserved.)
 
Berryville School - 1835 and 1872 buildings
located on east side of Lake Shore Road
According to W.S. Dearsley (see map below) one of the oldest settlers on the Lake Shore Road in the Berryville area north of Kenosha, the first school in Berryville District No. 11 was built about 1835. In 1855 an addition was built. A new building was constructed in 1872, when 36 pupils were in attendance. Both buildings occupied sites on the east side of Lake Shore Road. The first is being used as a granary on the J.W. Hansche farm, and the second is now a part of the home of Emil Julius on the Dearsley Road.

In 1923 the C.F. Kreuger family (related to the Klapproth family) sold property on the corner of Lake Shore Road and Berryville Road for the purpose of erecting a new modern schoolhouse. See location and map below. Construction cost was $31,000.00. A four room wing was added several years later for a cost of $75,000.00. Enrollment at Berryville School averaged 300.


Partial 1908 Map of Somers Township, Kenosha County, showing the community of Berryville
See "box" on east side of Lake Shore Road - intersection with Berryville Road (now Highway A)
Notice unusual curve in Berryville Road and Country Club Road (now known as 13th Avenue)


Early teachers
 Among the early teachers were: William Longmore, Helena Ozanne, Mary Cunningham, Alice Moss, Alice McCormick, G.M. Hoffman, Alice Stannard, Mary Moran, G.M. Kerkhoff, Edna Perry and Frank Swingle taught in schoolhouse #2.
As the population along the lake shore increased it was necessary to build again, and today Number 11 is one of the finest red brick on the west side of the highway, with a large playground and community hall, now employing five teachers.
(Source: My Memoirs, by Minnie A.G. Ozanne. Copyright 1948--Minnie A.G. Ozanne. All Rights Reserved.)

Berryville Classes in the 1930's
 
 

Berryville School
Warren Kramer's 4th Grade Class
(Source:  Original Photo Courtesy of Warren Kramer)
Click on photo for larger view.

Berryville School
First Grade, 1935
Teacher: Mr. Terrill
(Source: Original Photo Courtesy of Warren Kramer)
Click on photo for larger view.

Berryville School
Grades 3 and 4.  Date 1936 (see blackboard date)
(Source: Original Photo Courtesy of Warren Kramer)
Click on photo for larger view.




Berryville School - "x" Irvin Klapproth (born 1923) 2nd Grade
Date Approximate 1930
(Source:  Photo Courtesy of Jacqueline Klapproth Nelson)
Click on photo for larger view.

Berryville School Mother's Club Picnic at Petrifying Springs Park
"Me" is Vernetta Klapproth
Date Approximate mid-1930's
(Source:  Photo Courtesy of Jacqueline Klapproth Nelson)

Berryville School Class Photo
"X" is Melvin Klapproth, born 1931
Approximate Date:  Early 1940's
(Source:  Photo Courtesy of Jacqueline Klapproth Nelson)
Click on photo for larger view.




Berryville School
First Grade Class of 1935
(Source:  Photo Courtesy of Warren and Lyla Kramer)
Click on photo for larger view.




Berryville Kindergarten class photo taken in front of the schoolhouse.
Noted by the blue arrow, Melvin Klapproth.
1930's
(Source:  Photo courtest of Jacqueline Klapproth Nelson.  Copyright 2012.  All Rights Reserved)

















Berryville students loaded in a neighborhood farmer's livestock truck on their way to a picnic in 1936.  Typically all the picnics were held at Petrifying Spring Park about a mile away on Berryville Road.
(Source:  Original photo courtesy of Jacqueline Klapproth Nelson.  Copyright 2012.  All Rights Reserved.)










Berryville School - New Building 1923



Berryville School.  View from Lake Shore Drive (known as Sheridan Road or Highway 32).
Click on image for larger view.
( Source: Courtesy of Marilyn Ward Personal Photo Collection.)




This is the view of the new addition (kindergarten classes with wall of windows.  Looking north/northwest
Click on image for larger view.
( Source: Courtesy of Marilyn Ward Personal Photo Collection.  Photo date 1960)





Berryville School with new addition.  View to the northeast.
Click on image for larger view.
( Source: Courtesy of Marilyn Ward Personal Photo Collection.)











Aerial view of Berryville School looking toward the northwest.  See Chicago Railroad Tracks.
See softball diamonds and round area in the grass that served as an ice rink in the winter.
Click on image for larger view.
( Source: Courtesy of Marilyn Ward Personal Photo Collection.)



Mid City Outdoor Theatre.  View to the west.  Notice the shore line of Lake Michigan.
See the white fence and Berryville School to the right of the Theatre.
The road to the right is Berryville Road (now Highway A) which runs east and west.
Click on image for larger view.
( Source: Courtesy of Marilyn Ward Personal Photo Collection.)



Marilyn Ward on swings in the schoolyard.  Mid City Outdoor Theatre and fence to the right.
1959
Click on image for larger view.
( Source: Courtesy of Marilyn Ward Personal Photo Collection.)



Marilyn Ward swings on the monkey bars in the schoolyard. 
1959
Click on image for larger view.
( Source: Courtesy of Marilyn Ward Personal Photo Collection.)




Mrs. Ward, first grade teacher, at her desk in the classroom.  Her daughter Marilyn patiently sits in the desk.
1962
Click on image for larger view.
( Source: Courtesy of Marilyn Ward Personal Photo Collection.)



Mrs. Ward, first grade teacher grades student papers at her desk.
1963
Click on image for larger view.
( Source: Courtesy of Marilyn Ward Personal Photo Collection.)


Mrs. Ward's classroom and bulletin board "Santa Claus is coming to Berryville"
1959
Click on image for larger view.
( Source: Courtesy of Marilyn Ward Personal Photo Collection.)








Marilyn Ward builds big snow balls in the schoolyard.  Notice the ice skating rink in the foreground, a favorite of the students.
1962
Click on image for larger view.
( Source: Courtesy of Marilyn Ward Personal Photo Collection.)

Marilyn Ward plays on the merry-go-round in the playground.  Notice the bike racks for those students who would ride bikes to school.
1962
Click on image for larger view.
( Source: Courtesy of Marilyn Ward Personal Photo Collection.)






What happened to Berryville School?
In 1855 the first Berryville School opened its door.  125 years later, in 1980, Berryville School closed due to declining enrollment.
The third generation of pioneer families, those who created and built Berryville School, many of who still resided in the area, and were passionate about retaining a neighborhood school that had caring and talented teachers who taught not only curriculum but reinforced parental teachings such manners, kindness, citizenship, and community involvement.  They experienced the benefits of a neighborhood school and wanted this to continue for future generations.  Parents of this small school all had an investment in their child’s education and they drew together by volunteering and fund-raising on behalf of their children.  The close knit relationships and teaching environment could not be replicated by merging into a large school district.  The arguments were good ones and they could not be denied.   However, in the end, it became of matter of affordability.

In 1989 the Somers Fire Department conducted a fire inspection and report on the schoolhouse.  The schoolhouse included eleven classrooms, one kindergarten classroom, toilets, basement, multi-purpose room, kitchen, service and storage areas. The inspection identified cracks in the foundation and exterior walls, exposed duct work, a cracked and defective chimney and missing and rotten shingles.  The coal bin still existed and needed removal, plumbing was poor, electrical was poor, asbestos was present in the floors and insulation and the windows needed replacement along with a new roof.  There was evidence of vandals gaining entrance which resulted in broken plaster, holes in floors and ceilings, and other damage.

An architectural review by Robert M. Kueny on September 29. 1989 made the following conclusions:

  1. There are questions of educational philosophy, location, student population, transportation and providing equal or equivalent programs and facilities studied district-wide before investing in an old, marginal building in a remote location.

  2. Too many problems with the building that, when it was in its prime condition, was no more than average quality.  To turn on the water, gas, electric, add a little repair work and paint and have a serviceable school is not possible.

  3. $30 a square foot and a total cost of $600,000 to bring an abandoned building with little or no care for the last 9 years is a very poor investment.

  4. To construct an addition in an attempt to provide a quality comprehensive grade school capable of delivering a program comparable to Bose and Jeffery would cost within 75% of a new building.  The 3 acre site is too small and has inefficiencies of layout, supervision controls, and would be too expensive – and on going.

Berryville School was located on a 3 acre site on the southwest corner of Highway 32 (Sheridan Road) and county Highway A (Berryville Road).  The school was demolished.  Today the property is a residential condominium development.

Announcement Berryville School sold.
Click on image for larger view.
( Source: Kenosha News, 1991. Clipping courtesy of Marilyn Ward Personal Collection.)

Mrs. June Ward stands in the front door of Berryville School.
Open classrooms in the brick schoolhouse built in the 1920's.
Click on image for larger view.
( Source: Kenosha News, Nov. 15, 1991.  Clipping courtesy of Marilyn Ward Personal Collection.)





Mrs. June Ward stands in the arch of Berryville School.
Click on image for larger view.
( Source: Courtesy of Marilyn Ward Personal Photo Collection. Circa about 1991)

Mrs. June Ward stands in one of classrooms for the last time.
Click on image for larger view.
( Source: Courtesy of Marilyn Ward Personal Photo Collection. Circa about 1991)

View looking west.  The last remaining archway of the brick schoolhouse built in the 1920's.
Click on image for larger view.
( Source: Courtesy of Marilyn Ward Personal Photo Collection. Circa about 1991)

2nd floor hallways in the schoolhouse built in the 1920's.
Click on image for larger view.
( Source: Courtesy of Marilyn Ward Personal Photo Collection. Circa about 1991)

Kindergarden Classroom
Click on image for larger view.
( Source: Courtesy of Marilyn Ward Personal Photo Collection. Circa about 1991)


Mrs. June Ward stands in the front door of Berryville School.
Open classrooms in the brick schoolhouse built in the 1920's.
Click on image for larger view.
( Source: Courtesy of Marilyn Ward Personal Photo Collection.  Circa about 1991)

Mrs. June Ward, long term beloved first grade teacher, takes one last look at her Berryville School.
Click on image for larger view.
( Source:  Courtesy of Marilyn Ward Personal Photo Collection. Circa about 1991)


Berryville School "In the News"

"Mrs. Frank Heinen was hostess to the Berryville Junior Mothers' Club at her home Wednesday afternoon.  The time was spent in sewing, after which lunch was served.  The date for the entertainment for the members' families was set for Sept 29.  The next meeting will be held at Mrs. Boyd Christensen's."
(Source:  Racine Journal Sept. 8, 1934)

"Berryville Mothers' Club met at Berryville School Wednesday afternoon with 19 members and one guest present.  Plans were made for a box social to be held at the school Friday night, Sept. 21.  Potluck lunch was served.  The next meeting will be held at the school on Sept. 19.
(Source:  Racine Journal Sept. 8, 1934)

























 

Famous 'Anna' author Margaret Landon born in Somers

Photo and Text Courtesy of Kenosha News, January 19, 1968 publication
"Somers, Wisconsin is a long way from Siam in miles and climate and people and customs, but one Somers native made the transition.
Her book, "Anna and the King of Siam" has delighted a generation of readers, and the subsequent stage play and movie (retitled "The King and I") has given theater audiences an insight into the country now known as Thailand.
That author, Margaret Mortenson Landon, was born in 1902 in the village of Somers and lived there for the first year or two of her life, but this fact was known until recently only among her relatives and a few others.
The house where Margaret Mortenson Landon was born is still standing, much as it was then.  With a room added at the front, it is now owned and occupied by Mrs. Ernest Tabbert.
Margaret Landon returned to visit the Racine-Kenosha area.  Her mother remained close to her two sisters, Mrs. Albert (Minnie) Bishop, and Mrs. Wilfred (Julia) Bush.
(Source:  Kenosha News January 19, 1968)

Margaret Landon, an American writer, also known as Margaret Dorothea Mortenson, was born to Anenus Duabus "A.D." and Adelle Mortensen in Somers, Wisconsin.  She was one of three daughters is a devout Methodist family.
Margaret became famous for Anna and the King of Siam, her 1944 novel of the life of Anna Leonowens.  Her book on Leonowens was published in 1944 and became an instant bestseller.  It eventually sold over a million copies and was published in more than twenty languages.  In 1950, Mrs. Landon sold the musical play rights to Richard Rodgers and Oscar Hammerstein II, who created the musical The King and I from her book. 
She attended Wheaton College in Wheaton, Illinois, graduating in 1925.  She taught school for a year, then married Kenneth Landon, who she knew from Wheaton, and in 1927 they signed up as Presbyterian missionaries to Thailand.
Bewtween 1927-1937, Landon raised her three children while running a mission school in Trang and read extensively about the country.  During her readings, she learned about Ann Leonowens, the late-19th Century governess to the Siamese royal family.  When the Landon family returned to American in 1937, she soon began writing articles and then began researching material for a book on Leonowens.
Margaret Landon was married 67 years.  She died in Alexandria, Virginia, December 4, 1993, aged 90, leaving 13 grandchildren and 25 great-grandchildren.  She is interred in Whaton Cemetery in Illinois.
(Source:  Wikipedia) 

Tuesday, September 27, 2011

1835 Berryville School

Berryville's first school, above, now is used for grain storage on the John Hansche farm.  The log structure was completed in 1855, and set amidst an area long known for the variety of berries growing around the farms.  A second school was built in 1872, later used for onion storage, and torn down about six years ago.
(Source: Photo Courtesy of Kenosha News November 8, 1955)

School District No. 11 - Berryville School
"The first school in the northeastern section of our township was Number 11, later called Berryville School.  The first building was a log house built on the east side of the highway.  Later a frame building was built on the same site.  The log building is now is use as a granary on the John Hansche farm, and the frame building built about 1872 is used as an onion storage house.
As the population along the lake shore increased it was necessary to build again, and today Number 11 is one of the finest red brick on the west side of the highway, with a large playground and community hall, now employing five teachers.  Among the early teachers were:  William Longmore, Helena Ozanne, Mary Cunningham, Alice Moss, Alice McCormick, G.M. Hoffman, Alice Stannard, Mary Moran, G.M. Kerkhoff, Edna Perry.
Frank Swingle taught in Number 2 building for five years, and it was while he was instructor there, that a meeting was held in his school building, that was the originating of the "Cabbage Disease Control, October of 1897."  This devastating disease "Cabbage Yellows" was ruining the cabbage storage business in the lake shore counties.
Following this first meeting, the disease resistant cabbage was developed by Dr. H.L. Russell and Dr. L.R. Jones of Wisconsin College of Agriculture, with the faithful cooperation of the lake shore truck growers.
As a result of this first meeting in Our town, the cabbage crowing business in Wisconsin and the United States was saved.
(Source: My Memoirs, by Minnie A.G. Ozanne. Copyright 1948--Minnie A.G. Ozanne. All Rights Reserved.)

More About the History of Berryville School
According to W.S. Dearsley, one of the oldest settlers on the Lake Shore Road in the Berryville area north of Kenosha, the first school in Berryville District No. 11 was built about 1835.  In 1855 an addition was built.  A new building was constructed in 1872, when 36 pupils were in attendance.  Both buildings occupied sites on the east side of Lake Shore Road.  The first is being used as a granary on the J.W. Hansche farm, and the second is now a part of the home of Emil Julius on the Dearsley Road.
In 1923 the C.F. Kreuger family sold property on the corner of Lake Shore Road and Berryville Road for the purpose of erecting a new modern schoolhouse.  See location and map below.  Construction cost was $31,000.00.  A four room wing was added several years later for a cost of $75,000.00.  Enrollment at Berryville School averaged 300.


1908 Map of Somers Township, Berryville neighborhood
School located east of Lake Shore Drive
C.F. Krueger parcel sold for new Berryville School 1923