Wednesday, September 28, 2011

Berryville School History

 
 
The First Berryville School - 1855 
Berryville's first school, above, now is used for grain storage on the John Hansche farm in Berryville. The log structure was completed in 1855, and set amidst an area long known for the variety of berries growing around the farms. A second school was built in 1872 (see photo below) was later used for onion storage, and torn down about six years ago.
(Source: Photo Courtesy of Jacqueline Klapproth Nelson)
 
 
Berryville School - Class of 1877
 
(Source: Photo Courtesy of Kenosha News June 15, 1935 Centennial Edition)
 
 
Berryville Schoolhouse - Built 1872 
 
This is the second Berryville Schoolhouse, built in 1872.
33 students
"Dutch" Linstroth and his cousin "Dan" Klapproth (born 1894)
Click on photo for larger view.
(Original Photo Source:  Courtesy of Jacqueline Klapproth Nelson.  Copyright 2012.  All Rights Reserved.)
 
Berryville School - 1835 and 1872 buildings
located on east side of Lake Shore Road
According to W.S. Dearsley (see map below) one of the oldest settlers on the Lake Shore Road in the Berryville area north of Kenosha, the first school in Berryville District No. 11 was built about 1835. In 1855 an addition was built. A new building was constructed in 1872, when 36 pupils were in attendance. Both buildings occupied sites on the east side of Lake Shore Road. The first is being used as a granary on the J.W. Hansche farm, and the second is now a part of the home of Emil Julius on the Dearsley Road.

In 1923 the C.F. Kreuger family (related to the Klapproth family) sold property on the corner of Lake Shore Road and Berryville Road for the purpose of erecting a new modern schoolhouse. See location and map below. Construction cost was $31,000.00. A four room wing was added several years later for a cost of $75,000.00. Enrollment at Berryville School averaged 300.


Partial 1908 Map of Somers Township, Kenosha County, showing the community of Berryville
See "box" on east side of Lake Shore Road - intersection with Berryville Road (now Highway A)
Notice unusual curve in Berryville Road and Country Club Road (now known as 13th Avenue)


Early teachers
 Among the early teachers were: William Longmore, Helena Ozanne, Mary Cunningham, Alice Moss, Alice McCormick, G.M. Hoffman, Alice Stannard, Mary Moran, G.M. Kerkhoff, Edna Perry and Frank Swingle taught in schoolhouse #2.
As the population along the lake shore increased it was necessary to build again, and today Number 11 is one of the finest red brick on the west side of the highway, with a large playground and community hall, now employing five teachers.
(Source: My Memoirs, by Minnie A.G. Ozanne. Copyright 1948--Minnie A.G. Ozanne. All Rights Reserved.)

Berryville Classes in the 1930's
 
 

Berryville School
Warren Kramer's 4th Grade Class
(Source:  Original Photo Courtesy of Warren Kramer)
Click on photo for larger view.

Berryville School
First Grade, 1935
Teacher: Mr. Terrill
(Source: Original Photo Courtesy of Warren Kramer)
Click on photo for larger view.

Berryville School
Grades 3 and 4.  Date 1936 (see blackboard date)
(Source: Original Photo Courtesy of Warren Kramer)
Click on photo for larger view.




Berryville School - "x" Irvin Klapproth (born 1923) 2nd Grade
Date Approximate 1930
(Source:  Photo Courtesy of Jacqueline Klapproth Nelson)
Click on photo for larger view.

Berryville School Mother's Club Picnic at Petrifying Springs Park
"Me" is Vernetta Klapproth
Date Approximate mid-1930's
(Source:  Photo Courtesy of Jacqueline Klapproth Nelson)

Berryville School Class Photo
"X" is Melvin Klapproth, born 1931
Approximate Date:  Early 1940's
(Source:  Photo Courtesy of Jacqueline Klapproth Nelson)
Click on photo for larger view.




Berryville School
First Grade Class of 1935
(Source:  Photo Courtesy of Warren and Lyla Kramer)
Click on photo for larger view.




Berryville Kindergarten class photo taken in front of the schoolhouse.
Noted by the blue arrow, Melvin Klapproth.
1930's
(Source:  Photo courtest of Jacqueline Klapproth Nelson.  Copyright 2012.  All Rights Reserved)

















Berryville students loaded in a neighborhood farmer's livestock truck on their way to a picnic in 1936.  Typically all the picnics were held at Petrifying Spring Park about a mile away on Berryville Road.
(Source:  Original photo courtesy of Jacqueline Klapproth Nelson.  Copyright 2012.  All Rights Reserved.)










Berryville School - New Building 1923



Berryville School.  View from Lake Shore Drive (known as Sheridan Road or Highway 32).
Click on image for larger view.
( Source: Courtesy of Marilyn Ward Personal Photo Collection.)




This is the view of the new addition (kindergarten classes with wall of windows.  Looking north/northwest
Click on image for larger view.
( Source: Courtesy of Marilyn Ward Personal Photo Collection.  Photo date 1960)





Berryville School with new addition.  View to the northeast.
Click on image for larger view.
( Source: Courtesy of Marilyn Ward Personal Photo Collection.)











Aerial view of Berryville School looking toward the northwest.  See Chicago Railroad Tracks.
See softball diamonds and round area in the grass that served as an ice rink in the winter.
Click on image for larger view.
( Source: Courtesy of Marilyn Ward Personal Photo Collection.)



Mid City Outdoor Theatre.  View to the west.  Notice the shore line of Lake Michigan.
See the white fence and Berryville School to the right of the Theatre.
The road to the right is Berryville Road (now Highway A) which runs east and west.
Click on image for larger view.
( Source: Courtesy of Marilyn Ward Personal Photo Collection.)



Marilyn Ward on swings in the schoolyard.  Mid City Outdoor Theatre and fence to the right.
1959
Click on image for larger view.
( Source: Courtesy of Marilyn Ward Personal Photo Collection.)



Marilyn Ward swings on the monkey bars in the schoolyard. 
1959
Click on image for larger view.
( Source: Courtesy of Marilyn Ward Personal Photo Collection.)




Mrs. Ward, first grade teacher, at her desk in the classroom.  Her daughter Marilyn patiently sits in the desk.
1962
Click on image for larger view.
( Source: Courtesy of Marilyn Ward Personal Photo Collection.)



Mrs. Ward, first grade teacher grades student papers at her desk.
1963
Click on image for larger view.
( Source: Courtesy of Marilyn Ward Personal Photo Collection.)


Mrs. Ward's classroom and bulletin board "Santa Claus is coming to Berryville"
1959
Click on image for larger view.
( Source: Courtesy of Marilyn Ward Personal Photo Collection.)








Marilyn Ward builds big snow balls in the schoolyard.  Notice the ice skating rink in the foreground, a favorite of the students.
1962
Click on image for larger view.
( Source: Courtesy of Marilyn Ward Personal Photo Collection.)

Marilyn Ward plays on the merry-go-round in the playground.  Notice the bike racks for those students who would ride bikes to school.
1962
Click on image for larger view.
( Source: Courtesy of Marilyn Ward Personal Photo Collection.)






What happened to Berryville School?
In 1855 the first Berryville School opened its door.  125 years later, in 1980, Berryville School closed due to declining enrollment.
The third generation of pioneer families, those who created and built Berryville School, many of who still resided in the area, and were passionate about retaining a neighborhood school that had caring and talented teachers who taught not only curriculum but reinforced parental teachings such manners, kindness, citizenship, and community involvement.  They experienced the benefits of a neighborhood school and wanted this to continue for future generations.  Parents of this small school all had an investment in their child’s education and they drew together by volunteering and fund-raising on behalf of their children.  The close knit relationships and teaching environment could not be replicated by merging into a large school district.  The arguments were good ones and they could not be denied.   However, in the end, it became of matter of affordability.

In 1989 the Somers Fire Department conducted a fire inspection and report on the schoolhouse.  The schoolhouse included eleven classrooms, one kindergarten classroom, toilets, basement, multi-purpose room, kitchen, service and storage areas. The inspection identified cracks in the foundation and exterior walls, exposed duct work, a cracked and defective chimney and missing and rotten shingles.  The coal bin still existed and needed removal, plumbing was poor, electrical was poor, asbestos was present in the floors and insulation and the windows needed replacement along with a new roof.  There was evidence of vandals gaining entrance which resulted in broken plaster, holes in floors and ceilings, and other damage.

An architectural review by Robert M. Kueny on September 29. 1989 made the following conclusions:

  1. There are questions of educational philosophy, location, student population, transportation and providing equal or equivalent programs and facilities studied district-wide before investing in an old, marginal building in a remote location.

  2. Too many problems with the building that, when it was in its prime condition, was no more than average quality.  To turn on the water, gas, electric, add a little repair work and paint and have a serviceable school is not possible.

  3. $30 a square foot and a total cost of $600,000 to bring an abandoned building with little or no care for the last 9 years is a very poor investment.

  4. To construct an addition in an attempt to provide a quality comprehensive grade school capable of delivering a program comparable to Bose and Jeffery would cost within 75% of a new building.  The 3 acre site is too small and has inefficiencies of layout, supervision controls, and would be too expensive – and on going.

Berryville School was located on a 3 acre site on the southwest corner of Highway 32 (Sheridan Road) and county Highway A (Berryville Road).  The school was demolished.  Today the property is a residential condominium development.

Announcement Berryville School sold.
Click on image for larger view.
( Source: Kenosha News, 1991. Clipping courtesy of Marilyn Ward Personal Collection.)

Mrs. June Ward stands in the front door of Berryville School.
Open classrooms in the brick schoolhouse built in the 1920's.
Click on image for larger view.
( Source: Kenosha News, Nov. 15, 1991.  Clipping courtesy of Marilyn Ward Personal Collection.)





Mrs. June Ward stands in the arch of Berryville School.
Click on image for larger view.
( Source: Courtesy of Marilyn Ward Personal Photo Collection. Circa about 1991)

Mrs. June Ward stands in one of classrooms for the last time.
Click on image for larger view.
( Source: Courtesy of Marilyn Ward Personal Photo Collection. Circa about 1991)

View looking west.  The last remaining archway of the brick schoolhouse built in the 1920's.
Click on image for larger view.
( Source: Courtesy of Marilyn Ward Personal Photo Collection. Circa about 1991)

2nd floor hallways in the schoolhouse built in the 1920's.
Click on image for larger view.
( Source: Courtesy of Marilyn Ward Personal Photo Collection. Circa about 1991)

Kindergarden Classroom
Click on image for larger view.
( Source: Courtesy of Marilyn Ward Personal Photo Collection. Circa about 1991)


Mrs. June Ward stands in the front door of Berryville School.
Open classrooms in the brick schoolhouse built in the 1920's.
Click on image for larger view.
( Source: Courtesy of Marilyn Ward Personal Photo Collection.  Circa about 1991)

Mrs. June Ward, long term beloved first grade teacher, takes one last look at her Berryville School.
Click on image for larger view.
( Source:  Courtesy of Marilyn Ward Personal Photo Collection. Circa about 1991)


Berryville School "In the News"

"Mrs. Frank Heinen was hostess to the Berryville Junior Mothers' Club at her home Wednesday afternoon.  The time was spent in sewing, after which lunch was served.  The date for the entertainment for the members' families was set for Sept 29.  The next meeting will be held at Mrs. Boyd Christensen's."
(Source:  Racine Journal Sept. 8, 1934)

"Berryville Mothers' Club met at Berryville School Wednesday afternoon with 19 members and one guest present.  Plans were made for a box social to be held at the school Friday night, Sept. 21.  Potluck lunch was served.  The next meeting will be held at the school on Sept. 19.
(Source:  Racine Journal Sept. 8, 1934)

























 

No comments:

Post a Comment